Incidence of H. pylori infection among employees of the University of Baguio

Geraldine M. Agpes, RMT, MD, FPSP,MPH1, Erlinda P. Sanchez, RMT, MPA1 and Teresa N. Villanueva, RMT, MACT2
1 Faculty, School of Natural Sciences
University of Baguio, Baguio City Philippines
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7357-8266
Email: gmagpes@e.ubaguio.edu
2 Dean, School of Natural Sciences
University of Baguio, Baguio City Philippines
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1792-3333

ABSTRACT

Most upper gastrointestinal diseases like chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric tumors, and mucosa-associated lymphoma tissue (MALT) lymphoma are associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Some studies relate H. pylori to a high Body Mass Index. The study’s objective was to determine  H. pylori-positive cases among the University of Baguio employees. Considering rare data on H. pylori infection in the Philippines, this institution-based Research can be a basis for future studies. Also,  the study aimed to determine a significant difference in the number of H. pylori-positive cases in terms of age, gender, ABO blood type, cigarette/tobacco smoking, and clinical history. A survey questionnaire was used for the study.BMI was computed for each participant. Stool Antigen Test was used to determine H. pylori infection. Out of 128 symptomatic and with identified risk factors,Only forty-six (46)  or 35.94% employees submitted stool samples. Out of the 46 employees tested, five (5) or 10.87% tested positive for H. pylori. Of the five, three (or 60%) were non-teaching employees. The respondents were significantly different in terms of age, where t(4) = 13.880, p = 0.000. There is no significant difference as to gender because all were females. However, significant difference in ABO blood type was noted, where t(4) = 3.810, p = 0.019. They were non-cigarette or non-tobacco smokers; two (or 40%) were obese, two (or 40%) were overweight, while the last had normal BMI. All denied  family history of gastric Carcinoma; however, three (or 60%) were previously diagnosed with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), while another was diagnosed with Functional Dyspepsia. The conclusion for this study is that the number of tested employees is inadequate to establish the incidence of H. pylori infection among the UB employees.

Keywords: incidence, H. pylori infection, employees, GERD, Stool